DMPTool2 Release Schedule Update

Spring by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1894. No doubt in anticipation of the DMPTool2 Release. Provided by getty.edu

Spring by Lawrence Alma-Tadema. Provided by getty.edu

The DMPTool team just concluded our meetings last week at CDL to hash out the remaining work to be done before the DMPT2 release. To ensure quality, we’re pushing the release of this update back to Spring, with a soft open for administrators coming a few weeks before the wide release. As those dates approach, we’ll have a more specific timeline for you.

Several members of the DMPTool team will be speaking at the upcoming International Digital Curation Conference in San Francisco. We’ll be running a workshop on Monday the 24th of February to discuss the upcoming features in the DMPTool. You can find the workshop schedule here. If you plan to attend IDCC be sure to register for the workshop early!

DMPTool 2 Feature Highlight: Guidance and Review

In this final feature highlight post, we’re going to focus on the ways the DMPTool 2 can make it easier for grant writers to get feedback on their data management plans.

Submitting for Review

The DMPTool 2's submission page, allowing for review.

The DMPTool 2′s submission page, allowing for review.

Institutions have the option to allow their grant writers to save and submit their completed data management plans for review. Users that have been granted “reviewer” permission – who have been trained or demonstrated an understanding of DMP writing – will be able to comment on the plan before it is exported and added to the grant as a whole. We want to create a tool that not only collects up-to-date, useful data management information but also facilitates communication and makes it as easy as possible for data services to have a broad impact.

Our previous feature highlight talked about the ability to designate users as co-creators to assist in the writing of data management plans. The review structure is essentially a wider implementation of the same principle. Institutions with staff contributing to data services can opt in to this plan, giving their homepage not only the same customized access to the tool but also a list of plans available for review.

The user homepage, with DMPs for My Review section

The user homepage, with DMPs for My Review section

This will create an new line of communication, and a new way to make researchers aware of the resources at their disposal. While not every data practices problem can be addressed through this collaborative structure, it does provide a new way for librarians, grant officers, and other stakeholders to identify and contact the members of their community who need help.

The DMPTool 2 is in active development now, and we’ll keep you up to date on the project over the coming weeks!

DMPTool 2 Feature Highlight: Co-Ownership & Administration

For this post, we’re going to look at some of the upcoming features to improve the DMPTool as a collaborative tool.

Institutional Customization

Administrators will be able to match the tool to the structure of their institution. For example, the main institutional administrator can designate editors and institutional reviewers to help researchers create excellent data management plans.

DMP Creators can select co-owners to edit the plan.

DMP Creators can select co-owners to edit the plan.

Co-Creation

Grant writing does not happen in a vacuum. While one person may be responsible for the creation of the document itself, there are stakeholders within and outside of the project that will want to contribute to the creation of the data management plan. To make the DMPTool easier to use in this regard, we’re adding a co-ownership functionality. Plan creators can designate specific users and grant them the ability to edit and provide feedback on their data management plan.

Plan owners can keep their plans private, share with their institution, or make it visible to all.

Plan owners can keep their plans private, share with their institution, or make it visible to all.

Example DMPs

One of the greatest teaching tools for data management planning is example DMPs. By structuring the administrative roles and plan co-owners in this way, the DMPTool is going to become an environment where users have control over who can see their data management plans. Plan owners can elect to make their data management plans visible publicly, within their institution, or only to the plan co-owners. Over time, each institution will be able to collect a series of plans to educate researchers and graduate students across their institution.

Call for Example Data Management Plans

One of the ways we are hoping to support DMPTool users is to provide examples of quality data management plans to go alongside the help text and example answers. It’s one of our more requested features, and gives new users a way to see the finished product they are working towards.

If you’ve created a data management plan that we can use as an example, email us at uc3@ucop.edu.

What are your burning questions about the DMPTool?

We are currently developing content for the new DMPTool site, to be launched early 2014 alongside the DMPTool Version 2. One of the components of the new website is a section of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). We want to be thorough – what questions do you have for us to answer? Comment on this blog, tweet us (@TheDMPTool), or email us (uc3@ucop.edu) with your suggestions.

Our current list of questions:

  1. How do I get to the DMPTool?
  2. What’s the purpose of the DMPTool?
  3. What can I do with theDMPTool?
  4. Who can create a data management plan using the DMPTool?
  5. How do I get to the DMPTool?
  6. What’s the purpose of the DMPTool?
  7. What can I do with theDMPTool?
  8. Who can create a data management plan using the DMPTool?
  9. Is use of the DMPTool free?
  10. Who owns the data management plans created with the DMPTool?
  11. Who created the DMPTool? Who owns it?
  12. My institution isn’t a “partner”. How can I make that happen?
  13. What does it mean to be a partner institution?
  14. What are the terms of use for the DMPTool?
  15. What is the privacy policy for the DMPTool?
  16. How do I sign up for the DMPTool?
  17. Can I get a PDF of the help text and resources without logging in?
  18. Where can I read more about funder requirements for DMPs?
  19. Who can help me at my institution?
  20. What does it mean to share my plan publicly?
  21. Are there examples of data management plans somewhere?
  22. I have a collaborator. How can we work on the same plan?
  23. What does it mean to have a plan “reviewed”? Who reviews it?
  24. How long will you save my plans?
  25. What if I move to a new institution?
  26. Will you share my information with anyone?
  27. Has [the funder] endorsed the use of the DMPTool?
  28. Does the DMPTool have the most up-to-date requirements?
  29. I’m a librarian. What are the benefits of becoming a DMPTool partner?
  30. How do I configure the DMPTool to work with Shibboleth?

DMPTool2 Feature Highlight: Interface and Customization

This week at the Digital Library Federation’s 2013 Forum in Austin, Texas the DMPTool team was given the opportunity to present some of the major changes coming in the DMPTool2. Over the next couple of weeks we’ll be posting in-depth feature highlights of how we’re improving the tool and what that will mean for DMP authors, tool administrators, and data support staff.

The new DMPTool home page, with updated content.

The new DMPTool home page, with updated content.

An extremely noticeable change comes in the form of the updated dashboard, with completely new visuals and a more robust way to create DMPs, administer the tool, and find best practices and guidance. In-progress data management plans, institution specific resources, DMPs for review, and useful templates will all be accessible from a single, user homepage. Similarly, creating your data management plan is easier to navigate, with a clear overview of where you are in the process and easy access to examples and prepopulated plans.

The DMPTool guidance page, with help from funders and your institution.

The DMPTool guidance page, with help from funders and your institution.

One of the most requested changes to the tool was a way to customize the help text provided from within the user interface. The DMPTool2 dashboard provides administrators with ways to not only customize the help text, links, and contact information but also the templates themselves. Users will have access to a centralized Funder Guidance page complete with links to basic templates, guidelines, and sample plans.

These changes will not only improve the tool itself, but also provide an easy way to centralize the information relevant to the researchers who will be using the tool. Making it as easy as possible to not only write a plan, but also find high quality information and resources is a central goal of this project.

The institution profile page - you can even upload your logo!

The institution profile page – you can even upload your logo!

For administrators, making major and incremental changes to the institution specific information your researchers can access will be possible directly through the interface. Administrators will be able to customize their institution’s information, provide example answers and help text, and link to libguides and other resources at pivotal points in the DMP’s creation. Making this kind of customization faster and easier will allow the specialists that administrate the tool to respond quickly to their users needs and feedback, and use the DMPTool not only as a way to help write data management plans, but also as an information source for anyone at their institution who interacts with the changing world of research grant writing.

Next time, we’ll be going over the ways the DMPTool lets you collaborate within your institution and publish your work to create quality data management plans.

DMPTool2 Project – October 2013 Report

Overview

DMPTool2 continues to take shape and we are now shifting more into planning for release and promotion.

Technical Team

The development team is presently focused on connecting the HTML presentation layer to the application layer and bringing the second version to reality!   We will share this as soon as it is ready for consumption.

We are presently in the midst of organizing plans for the first round of usability testing to be conducted at the DataONE All Hands Meeting in the 3rd week of October and then a broader round of testing across our community in the last week of October and first week of November.  These tests will be focused on the new administrative user interface.  We will then conduct similar tests on the researcher interface in later November.

We have spent a considerable amount of time thinking about how to transition from the old to the new tool.  At this time, we plan to initially release access to the administrative interface in early December to allow institutions to configure their content.  We will then make the new version available to all users in early January and allow researchers to still access the first version if they prefer.  In late February we will complete the transition and turn off the first version.  We will be handling a migration of data from the first to second version, but do not have specifics on that yet.

Communications/Outreach Team

Most notably perhaps, we reached our 100th institution with customized content during the past month.  This is a big deal and helps to gain additional traction and momentum for building this community.  On the outreach activity front, we have presentations of the new DMPTool in planning for the upcoming November DLF Forum, the December CNI Forum, and the February IDCC conference.

Metrics

No major update on metrics since the last report.

Overall Project

We are on schedule to release a final production version in February 2014.

DMPTool at the Data Information Literacy Symposium

Source: Flicker/kuap

Purdue University in Indiana hosted the Data Information Literacy (DIL) Symposium this year, a culmination of the IMLS funded research project on the DIL needs of technology driven research scientists. A dense, two-day session of seminars, discussions and poster presentation focused on experts from the field discussing their work as librarians to provide data services.

While the DIL Symposium recording is not yet posted for viewing, many of the materials are available online including presentation slides, one page descriptions of DIL competencies, and research posters. There’s also a Lib Guide hosted by Purdue with information on Instruction, Marketing, and Learning Objectives.

For librarians and other research support staff at any stage of their own data services, the topics covered at the DIL Symposium is a great knowledge source, with more information to come. Keep an eye on the DIL site’s news page and twitter for upcoming events and resources.

DMPTool adds 100th institution!

From Flickr by Anvica

From Flickr by Anvica

We are pleased to announce that as of September 23rd, with the addition of Baylor University100 institutions have taken the step of customizing the DMPTool to provide local guidance and resources for their researchers. Check out the full list of participating institutions.

While institutions do not have to customize the DMPTool for their researchers to take advantage of the tool, taking that step can provide many benefits to their researchers as well as their data management and stewardship programs. These include:

  • Integration with Shibboleth so that researchers can use their institutional credentials;
  • Ability to add help text and links to institutional resources;
  • Ability to add contact information for the units that support data management; and
  • Ability to add text that can be copied into a data management plan.

With the release of the new and improved DMPTool in early 2014, there will be even more functionality for those institutions who integrate with and customize the tool. These features include:

  • An interface to manage all of the customizations directly;
  • Improved institutional branding;
  • The ability to add institution specific data management requirements;
  • Reviews of DMPs on a case by case basis or as a required step for all researchers; and
  • Multiple roles for administrative users including as editors of requirements and reviewers of DMPs, so that you can have appropriate teams working on the DMPTool.

If you are interested in talking to us more about this process, please contact us. It is a straightforward process that we are happy to walk you through.

DMPTool2 Project – September 2013 Report

Overview

DMPTool2 is starting to shape-up and is moving into the period where the application and user interface will come together and we’ll start to see a real, live new version!

Technical Team

Over the past month we have seen tremendous advances in development of the application and user interface design.  The application has now been developed for the core functional areas around institutional profiles and creation of a DMP.  During this period, the team has worked with an outside vendor to develop and refine the entire user interface, matching quality design aspects with new functionality in the application.   The team has also been evaluating and incorporating enhancement requests from the community via the BitBucket issue-tracking page.

Communications/Outreach Team

The team has refined the outreach strategy over the past month and begun a relatively aggressive outreach and recruitment campaign to meet project goals and also increase awareness and use of the tool.  Responses were at first a bit slow, presumably due to summer vacations and semester starts, but we have recently been getting great responses and working with institutions on setup of Shibboleth and configuration of customized guidance.  We are very encouraged by these enthusiastic new users.  Additionally, we are now just shy of 100 institutions with this level of configuration/use.    

Metrics

We continue to make progress on reaching our project metrics.  Most notably this month, we have now completed 4 out of 6 conference presentations, have almost reached our goal of doubling the user base to reach 6,000 users, and have exceeded our goal of doubling plans created to exceed 5,000 plans.  Our main metric focus now is recruiting 50% of Shibboleth capable institutions and 75% of ARL institutions.

Overall Project

Our project timeline has undergone some minor revision, and we now expect to release a complete beta version in December 2013, a second beta version in January 2014, and a final production version in February 2014.