Summer 2020 DMPTool Release

We’re very pleased to announce the release of several major new features for the DMPTool! This includes:

  • Integration with the Research Organization Registry (ROR) and Funder Registry (Fundref)
  • The ability to create conditional questions and set email notifications within DMP templates
  • Integration with Google Analytics for usage statistics
  • The ability to connect additional grant contributors (and their ORCIDs) to a plan

The release notes are available in the DMPTool GitHub and detailed descriptions are available below.

Research Organization and Funder Registry Integration

ROR is a registry of Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) for research organizations, which are defined as any organization that conducts, produces, manages, or touches research. ROR has generated identifiers for over 91,000 organizations so far. The Crossref Funder Registry (Fundref) is a registry of grant-giving organizations and has created over 20,000 identifiers so far. We now have 1,582 unique organizations matched with their RORs or Funder IDs within the DMPTool. 

Utilizing these identifiers within a DMP is a key step towards a truly machine-actionable DMP (maDMP). Employing PIDs such as ROR and Fundref in DMPs facilitates the linking of people, grants, and organizations, and enables better tracking and discovery of research outputs by institution. These identifiers will be included in our upcoming maDMP JSON export feature, which is due to be released in late summer and is key in enabling maDMP interactions via API integrations.

Snippet from our upcoming API utilizing the RDA Common Standard schema and incorporating RORs

Organizational administrators of the DMPTool may notice an increase in the number of users affiliated with your institution. As part of integrating with ROR and Fundref, we have connected 4,750 previously un-affiliated users with their host institution by matching email domains. 

Conditional Questions and Email Notifications

DMPTool administrators that take advantage of the feature to create or customize templates will be excited to learn that you can now reduce the number of questions included in a customized template by skipping questions. For example, if a research project is not creating or using any sensitive data, you can now modify a template in order to skip questions related to special handling of sensitive data.

Additionally, the new feature includes the ability to set email notifications that are triggered if a user selects a specific answer. For example, you may want to create an alert for large data volumes. 

Read more about utilizing these new features in our documentation or watch this video tutorial created by our DMPRoadmap colleagues at DMPOnline. 

Two important things to note about creating conditions and email notifications: 

1.  If you are creating a new template, save all questions first and then set the conditions on them.   

2. This feature only works on questions with structured answers including checkbox, drop downs or radio buttons. You can add a condition on a single option or a combination of responses. 

There has also been interest in enabling questions to be displayed when the user answers a conditional question instead of hiding them (the current default). We are currently consulting with the community to better understand the use cases, functionality, and scope of technical work to add this feature. This will be released after we complete our current work migrating to Rails v5 (Summer 2020). 

Google Analytics

Users can now use Google Analytics to track web statistics for an organizational account within the DMPTool. Statistics retrieved by Google Analytics include: number of sessions, users, average session duration, and pageviews. 

Users who are already using Google Analytics for tracking may want to add the DMPTool to their account. Connecting DMPTool to Google Analytics is a quick and easy process — simply copy the tracker code from your Google Analytics account and paste it into your Organizational Details page in the DMPTool and you’re good to go.

For further details about adding your DMPTool account to Google Analytics, please see our help documentation. Existing DMPTool Usage Statistics also remain accessible from within the DMPTool for all organizational administrators. 

Support for Multiple Contributors

A new tab entitled “Contributors” is now visible within the Create Plan interface. Here users can list contributors to a grant, including their ORCIDs, and select a role for each individual. This feature utilizes the CRediT, Contributor Roles Taxonomy to describe each contributor’s specific contribution. Using ORCIDs and a controlled vocabulary for roles will facilitate the tracking of key people involved in the project. This will allow contributors to receive credit for their work and will enable other stakeholders involved in the project to identify the key individuals involved.

Project start/end dates

To support our machine-actionable DMP work, we have added project start and end dates to the project details page. Having these key project dates as part of the DMP is essential in triggering actions at the appropriate moment. For example, a project end data can trigger an action to notify key stakeholders, such as repository managers or storage administrators, at the end of the grant.

What’s next?

Together with our DMPRoadmap colleagues, we are currently upgrading our infrastructure to Rails 5. This is a substantial piece of development work that, although entirely on the backend and invisible to users, is essential to keeping our service running and adding additional requested features. We expect this development to be completed in July.

Following the Rails upgrade, work will continue on our maDMP initiative and we plan on pushing out a feature to mint DOIs for DMPs late this summer. Additional features we are developing simultaneously include: support for multiple datasets within a DMP, an updated API and the ability to export plans as JSON, and a new template builder to facilitate the creation of maDMP templates within the application. We’ll continue to update you here as development work progresses.

As always, feedback or questions are most welcome and can be sent directly to maria.praetzellis@ucop.edu.

The DMPTool needs you!

DMPToolEditorialBoard

The DMPTool, which as of February 2020 has supported 44,415 users and 266 participating institutions, currently maintains thirty-eight templates for twenty-two different federal and private funders. It is no secret that funder requirements and subsequent application and data management guidance change regularly and it is crucial that the DMPTool reflects these changes in real time to remain a high-integrity resource. Staying up to date with rapidly changing grant requirements and RDM best practices is no small task, however. There is no magic wand or automated system to keep the DMPTool in sync with current requirements. Then how does it happen? The key factor in the success of the DMPTool over the last 9 years has been and continues to be the contributions of and collaboration with the user community.

As the capabilities of the DMPTool expand and needs for it rise, we are currently calling for additional community members to contribute and to ensure its continued success. We’re therefore pleased to announce the formation of and the invitation to join the DMPTool Editorial Board. Our goal for the Board is formalize existing community involvement in the tool and to have representation across disciplines with varied areas of expertise, from a wide range of institutions, including librarians along the full career spectrum. Experience working with DMPs is desirable and we welcome applications from any individuals committed to supporting effective research data management.

Responsibilities for members of the Editorial Board include the following:

  • One year term of service (with the opportunity to extend if desired)
  • Short bi-monthly (or as needed) meetings
  • Individual ownership of specific funder templates, linked to your area of focus
  • Creation of new templates as needed
  • Provide suggestions for default guidance and best practices
  • Identification and publication of example DMPs to include in the tool
  • Estimated 1-4 hours of work a month to check for requirement updates from funders, reporting to the Board, and updating templates and guidance in the DMPTool

Joining the DMPTool Editorial Board presents an excellent opportunity to meet fellow research data management professionals, actively contribute to the community, help support a critical piece of open-source technology advancing research data management, and keep abreast of the larger changes in funding requirements and the larger funding ecosystem. Editorial Board members will work to ensure the tool provides current information about grant requirements and corresponding guidance.

We hope you will consider this invitation to contribute and apply! We have opened applications and responses are due Friday, March 13. All questions, comments, concerns, or advice are welcome: maria.praetzellis@ucop.edu. We look forward to hearing from you!

New Year, New DMPTool Release

Our latest DMPTool release includes several exciting features and improvements, including a new API. The release highlights are outlined below, for a comprehensive listing please check our release notes for v2.1.4 and V2.1.3. 

API 

DMPTool administrators who have been granted tokens can now access statistical information about their organizational accounts and query plans created in the DMPTool via our new full text API. The API currently has 2 endpoints: Plans and Statistics. 

The full text Plans API allows users to retrieve plans as a JSON file and filter by dates, specific templates, users and plans. This new API will be essential in our work with machine-actionable DMPs as it will enable the export of plans into other RDM systems and facilitate further integration with external applications. 

The Statistics endpoint includes data regarding users, templates and plans. Users can retrieve information from this endpoint on queries such as: number of users who have joined your organization; number of plans created by your organization’s users; and metadata about all plans created by all users from your organization.

In order to use the API, permissions for each endpoint must be given to your organization and an API token must display on your ‘edit profile’ page. To request access to the API please contact us.

Please keep in mind that we will be updating the API to conform to the DMP Common Standard in Spring of 2020, so while the API is up and ready for use, we recommend holding off on building any integrations or applications around it until the updated version is released. 

One Click Plan Creation

Screenshot of the ability to create a new plan from the Funder Requirements page.

Users can now create a plan for a specific funder template from the Funder Requirements page instead of going through the create plan page. You can also retrieve a static URL to the plan that can be sent along to users, thus enabling them to go straight to the desired page. (A big thank you to DMPOPIDoR for contributing this new feature to our shared codebase.)

Accessibility

Building off several months of analysis, testing, and expert recommendations, the DMPRoadmap crew has been working towards making the DMPTool accessible for all users, including those with disabilities. Highlights of new accessibility features include: support for assistive technologies, improved visual cues and improvements to text magnification tools. A full list of all accessibility issues addressed in this release is available on our git repository.     

Create departments within an organization

The new Department field enables administrative users to define specific schools or departments to the organization. Our partners at DMPOnline have made a short video demonstrating how to utilize this new feature. 

Request Feedback

The button to Request Feedback on a plan has been moved to its own tab in an effort to highlight this feature. If you have the ability to request feedback enabled for your organization, it will now appear after the Share tab when creating a plan. If you don’t have this feature enabled but are interested in learning more, please check our documentation or contact us for any questions.

Request feedback tab has moved to the end

This year promises to be a busy one for the development crew with many big features currently in the works, including machine actionable DMPs, improved usage dashboards, and Zenodo/RIO Journal integration. For a high level overview of our upcoming work for 2020 please check out our development roadmap

As always, feedback or questions are most welcome and can be sent directly to maria.praetzellis@ucop.edu.

What’s new with our machine actionable DMP work?

Building on the conceptual framework laid out in articles such as Ten principles for machine-actionable data management plans and prior blog posts covering such topics as what maDMPs are, what they can do to support automation, utilizing common standards and PIDs, and maDMPs as living documents, we are now moving into active development on the technical aspects of our NSF funded EAGER research project

A phased approach: building a plan for maDMPs

The goal of our EAGER research project is to explore the potential of machine-actionable DMPs as a means to transform the DMPs from a compliance exercise based on static text documents into a key component of a networked research data management. This ecosystem will not only facilitate, but also improve the research process for all stakeholders. 

We will be laying out the phases of work in the coming months and will continue to use this blog to keep the community informed of our progress, and to solicit your feedback and ideas.

Phase 1 Workplan

maDMP_phase1

Phase 1 of of our research entails exploring the following three high level ideas:

  1. How to best restructure the DMPTool metadata to utilize the RDA Working Group Common Standard
  2. How to optimize the Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) metadata schema for DMPs 
  3. How to best incorporate other Persistent identifiers (PIDs) into DMPs

Common Standards

The common data model for the creation of machine-actionable DMPs, produced by the RDA working group on DMP Common Standards, was recently released for community feedback. Our partners at the Digital Curation Center (DCC) have now implemented this model into the DMPRoadmap codebase. A big thank you to Sam Rust from DCC for his work on this! Those interested in learning more about the Common Standard in DMPRoadmap may want to view a recent webinar recording of Sam detailing this work. This was a fundamental step towards machine actionable DMPs, as it forms the foundation to enable information flow between DMPs and affiliated external systems in a standardized manner.

DOIs for DMPs

With our partners at the Digital Curation Center (DCC), we are working to incorporate the common standards into the shared DMPRoadmap codebase and our DMPTool development plans. As part of this work, we have partnered with DataCite to update their metadata schema to better support DMPs and to optimize a workflow for generating DOIs for DMPs. By relying on the DOI infrastructure, we will then be able to utilize the Event Data service from DataCite to record when assertions have been made on the DOI. More on the workflows surrounding this aspect of the project below. 

DMPs and the PID graph

Projects such as Freya have been working to connect research outputs through a PID graph.  A key question underpinning much of our work is how we can best leverage the PID graph (see Principle 5: Use PIDs and controlled vocabularies) within the DMP ecosystem. To connect DMPs to the larger PID ecosystem, our first phase will also include incorporating the following persistent identifiers into the DMP as a baseline for future work:

Phase 1 workflows

As discussed above, in Phase 1, we are building a system to mint DOIs for DMPs and creating a landing page for DMP DOIs to record updates to the DOI that occur over time. Although the system can be thought of as a giant API, pulling and pushing data from various sources, we are also building a landing page for these DOIs in order to visually demonstrate the types of connections made possible by tracking a research project over time from the point of DMP creation. 

Below is a high level overview of this workflow and whiteboarding of its potential architecture. (For those that would like a more detailed view, please check out our GitHub).maDMPRegistry

  1. maDMP system accepts common standard metadata from DMPTool (DMP Roadmap) 
  2. maDMP system sends that metadata to DataCite to mint a DOI (which it then returns to the DMPTool)
  3. A landing page is generated for the DMP DOI
  4. A separate harvester application queries outside APIs to check for assertions recorded against the DOI. For this phase of work we will work with the NSF awards API, and return any award information into the maDMP system. 
  5. The maDMP system then sends any award info returned to DataCite 

Our goal is to leverage the work being done by the RDA Exposing DMP working group to help inform the privacy concerns of exposing certain types of assertions on this landing page.  

Next Steps

Looking ahead, we plan to produce a basic prototype ready for testing and feedback by the end of October. I will be presenting on our work thus far at the upcoming RDA and CODATA meetings. During these meetings, I look forward to continuing our work with the RDA Common Standards Working Group (and to meeting many of those active in this space for the first time in-person)! 

Once we establish the workflow to record assertions to a DMP DOI, our next phase of work will include pilot projects with domain-specific and institutional stakeholders to test the flow and integration of relevant information across services and systems. With these partners we plan to test how maDMPs can help track data management activities as they occur during the course of a grant project. 

Finally, it’s important to note that all of our development work is being done in a test environment where we will continue to iterate for the next several months as we determine how best to deploy new features to the DMPTool and DMPRoadmap codebase. 

Interested in contributing?

Lastly, we realize that maDMP is far from the most euphonious or creative name for this service (nor is our original idea of the DMPHub much better). We are open to any and all ideas for naming this work so if you have any ideas, however strange or off the wall, please do let us know. If we use your idea we promise to shower you with accolades for your denomination genius. Also, free stickers galore.

To review or contribute to the technical components of the project check out our GitHub. And most importantly, please send any and all feedback, questions, or ideas for names to maria.praetzellis@ucop.edu.

 

What’s new with the DMPTool?

The past few months have been quite fruitful in terms of pushing forward on the technical details surrounding machine-actionable DMPs.

The common data model for the creation of machine-actionable DMPs, produced by the RDA working group on DMP Common Standards, was recently released for community feedback. With our partners at the Digital Curation Center (DCC), we are now actively incorporating this model into the DMPRoadmap codebase and our DMPTool development plans.

As part of our NSF EAGER grant, CDL has partnered with DataCite to explore how DOI infrastructure could enable the passing of information between RDM systems and supporting integration between various related systems. The initial phase of this work includes piloting workflows that efficiently move information between stakeholders, systems, and researcher workflows. Our goal is a working prototype developed by mid-October of this year. This is exciting as it represents the first step towards realizing our long-term goal of machine-actionable DMPs as critical infrastructure in the research process.


Community involvement 

Another key goal for the coming months is to re-engage the DMPTool community via regular virtual user meetings, the re-creation of advisory boards, and most importantly hearing more from you about how the DMPTool is working (or not) and gathering feedback on future developments and ideas for new areas of making the DMPTool even more useful and vital. In the coming weeks, we will reach out with more details on the above. However, in the meantime, please feel free to contact me and introduce yourself!

I am interested in hearing any input, questions, comments or feedback. You can contact me directly at maria.praetzellis@ucop.edu.

Meet the new DMPTool Product Manager

MariaPraetzellisHeadshotToday, August 19, marks my seventh week as the new DMPTool Product Manager, and the latest Research Data Specialist to join the team at UC3. I’m thrilled to be joining such an active and engaged community of professionals committed to the principles of open science, open infrastructure, and public access to research and knowledge.

As I take the reins from Stephanie Simms, I’m grateful for her instrumental work in rethinking the capabilities of a data management plan (DMP) and her work with the community in developing the conceptual frameworks and use cases for the creation of machine-actionable DMPs. As I’ve learned more in these first weeks, I am invigorated by the plans for machine-actionable DMPs, seeing the critical role they could play in research and data sharing and the exciting potential for expanding their dynamism, utility, and centrality to research data workflows. 

Prior to joining CDL, I was a Program Manager in the Web Archiving and Data Services group at the Internet Archive. At the Internet Archive, I managed domain-scale web harvesting, dataset and indexing services, and computational access to large-scale data for researchers. I bring a strong background in product management for services used by a global set of partners and a commitment to community-driven feature development and system integrations. 

I’m looking forward to expanding upon this experience as I begin work on furthering development of the DMPTool, keeping in step with what can be useful to and benefit the community, and advancing our shared commitment to open access to research and research data.

Please feel free to reach out and introduce yourself! I’m eager to receive any feedback or questions. You can reach me directly at maria.praetzellis@ucop.edu.

Representing time in machine-actionable DMPs

In this next installment of the machine-actionable DMP blog series, we want to address the broader context of time to hone in on answering the following question:

How and when do you update some piece of information in a DMP?

This happens to be the substance of Principle 9 from our preprint, forthcoming in PLOS Miksa et al. 2018: maDMPs should be versioned, updatable, living documents.

DMPs should not just be seen as a “plan” but as updatable, versioned documents representing and recording the actual state of data management as the project unfolds. The act of planning is far more important than the plan itself, and to derive value for researchers and other stakeholders, the plan needs to evolve. DMPs should track the course of research activities from planning to sharing and preserving outputs, recording key events over the course of a project to become an evolving record of activities related to the implementation of the plan.

We can all agree that it’s important to treat maDMPs as living documents, but there are multiple approaches we might take to updating them, and multiple stakeholders who should be able to provide updates for particular pieces of information at particular points along the way. First we’ll provide a quick overview of the current state of DMP-time as represented in systems and policies related to our NSF EAGER project, plus a handful of other relevant systems and policies that extend the geographical and organizational scope. Then, we’ll pitch an idea for how we can handle DMP-time using Crossref/DataCite Event Data Service. We welcome, nay encourage your feedback about this and other ideas as we experiment and iterate and prove things out in practice.

Representing time in DMPs

So we built a graph database with seed data from our partners at BCO-DMO and the UC Gump Field Station on Moorea, and enriched it with information from the NSF Awards API and public plans created with the DMPTool. All of the projects represented in the database correspond with NSF awards and therefore the DMPs have an associated timeline of:

  1. Create DMP and submit grant proposal (via institutional Office of Research, NSF Fastlane system)
  2. Grant awarded (grant number issued by NSF)
  3. Grant period ends, final report due (data deposited at appropriate repository)

This current grant/DMP workflow fails to capture information about actual data management activities as they unfold over the course of a project, however, data management staff at BCO-DMO and the Gump Field Station perform interventions and provide manual updates in their own repository systems opportunistically. These updates can occur during active stages of multi-year projects and most of them are done at the grant closeout stage when researchers are engaged with reporting activities and aware that they must deposit their data. Relevant NSF program officers from the Geosciences Directorate conduct manual compliance checks to ensure that grantees have deposited data prior to issuing a new award, which is a very useful feature of this case study.

In addition to the data repository systems, information about these projects flows through institutional grant management systems, NSF’s Fastlane system, and a subset is made publicly available via the NSF Awards API (example of our award). Each of these systems records the start data and end date for the award, and some include interim reporting dates. Our ongoing analysis for maDMP prototyping is focused on identifying additional milestones during the course of a project and which stakeholders should be responsible for updating which pieces of information…drilling into the original question of how and when do you update things?

DMP-time in European contexts

To avoid an overly narrow focus on one national context and one funding agency in this larger thematic discussion about time, we’ll also consider some European examples. The European Commission’s Horizon 2020 program acknowledges the fact that information about research data changes from the planning to final preservation stages; as a result, DMPs have built-in versioning. Horizon 2020 proposals that receive an award must submit a first version of the DMP within the first 6 months of the project. The DMP needs to be updated over the course of the project whenever significant changes arise, however, this “requirement” is somewhat vague and reads more like a best practice. Updated versions of the DMP are required at any periodic reporting deadline and at the time of the final report. DMPonline provides an optional set of Horizon 2020 templates that includes an 1) Initial DMP, 2) Detailed DMP, and 3) Final review DMP.

Our maDMP collaborators at the Technical University of Vienna are forging ahead with their own institutional prototyping efforts to automate DMPs and integrate them with local infrastructure. They just released this excellent interactive “mockups” tool and invite your feedback. Within the mockups system, time is represented through the concept of DMP Granularity and in some cases this is related to funding status. The level of granularity corresponds roughly with versions, which carry the labels “initial, detailed, or sophisticated.”

Representing time in maDMPs: Ideas for the future

The ability to update DMPs is central to our own plans for realizing machine-actionability and relies on infrastructure that already exists. In a nutshell, our idea is to insert DMPs and corresponding grant numbers into the sprawling web of information connecting people and their published outputs. We think the mechanism for accomplishing this is to issue DataCite DOIs for DMPs: this creates an identifier against which we can assert things programmatically. In addition, this hooks DMPs into Crossref/DataCite Event Data, which is a stream of assertions of relationships between research-related things. Existing and emerging registries of information are already leveraging this infrastructure—Scholix, ORCID, Wikidata, Make Data Count, etc. DMPs and grant numbers would provide a view of the connections between everything at the project level.

Documentation for Event Data explains that it “is a hub for the collection and distribution of a variety of Events and contains data from a selection of Sources. Every Event has a time at which it was created. This is usually soon after the Event was observed. In addition to this, every Event has a theoretical date on which it occurred…dates are represented as the occurred_at, timestamp and updated_date fields on each Event. The Query API has two views which allow you to find Events filtered by both occurred_at and timestamp timescales. It also lets you query for Events that have been updated since a given date.” This hub of information would therefore support versioning of the DMP as well as dynamic updating of key pieces of information (e.g. data types, volumes, licenses, repositories) by various stakeholders over time. Stakeholders could rely on this open hub of information and begin to make plans based on it (e.g., a named repository learns that a TB of data is expected within a specific timeframe).

In this scenario, the DMP would become an assertion store (cf. Wikidata and Wikibase). The assertion store would have a timeline component and anyone could use the DMP identifier to ping/query the Event Data Query API and find out what’s been asserted about the project. Various DMP stakeholders could also assert things about the project and update information over time. Each stakeholder could query and model DMP information based on the types of relationships and get the specific details they’re interested in… so an institution could discover who their PIs are collaborating with[o], a funder could check[p] if a dataset has been deposited in a named repository, a repository manager could search for any changes to a specific project or all relevant projects within a specific date range, etc. Wikidata has already begun indexing policies, in fact; once this happens at scale and is integrated with indexing of datasets, we could have automated dashboards displaying policy compliance and project progress.

That’s about it. Please tell us what you think about this approach to transforming a DMP into something active and updated, versioned and linked to research outputs.

Common standards and PIDs for machine-actionable DMPs

QR code cupcakes

From Flickr by Amber Case CC BY-NC 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/caseorganic/4663192783/

Picking up where we left off from “Machine-actionable DMPs: What can we automate?”… Let’s unpack a couple of topics central to our machine-actionable DMP prototyping and automating efforts. These are the top rallying themes from all conversations, workshops, and working groups we’ve been privy to in the past few years. In addition, they feature in the “10 principles for machine-actionable DMPs” (principles 4 and 5):

  • DMP common standards
  • Persistent identifiers (PIDs)

DMP common standards
There’s community consensus about the need to first establish common standards for DMPs in order to enable anything else (Simms et al. 2017). Interoperability and delivery of DMP information across systems—to alleviate administrative burdens, improve quality of information, and reap other benefits—requires a common data model.

To address this requirement, the DMP Common Standards working group was launched at the 9th RDA plenary meeting in Barcelona. They’re making excellent progress and are on track to deliver a set of recommendations in 2019, which we intend to incorporate into our existing tools and emerging prototypes. Adoption of the common data model will enable tools and systems (e.g., CRIS, repositories, funder systems) involved in processing research data to read and write information to/from DMPs. The working group deliverables will be publicly available under a CC0 license and will consist of models, software, and documentation. For a summary of their scope and activities to date see Miksa et al. 2018.

A second round of consultation is underway currently to tease out more details and gather additional requirements about what DMP info is needed when for each stakeholder group. This international, multi-stakeholder working group is open to all; check out their session at the next RDA plenary in Botswana and contribute to the DMP common data model (6 Nov; remote participation is available).

Current/traditional DMPs - model questionnaires

<administrative_data>
    <question>Who will be the Principal Investigator?</question>
    <answer>The PI will be John Smith from our university.</answer>
</administrative data>
Machine-actionable DMPs - model information

“dc:creator”:[ {
         “foaf:name”:”John Smith”,
         “@id”:”orcid.org/0000-1111-2222-3333”,
         “foaf:mbox”:”mailto:jsmith@tuwien.ac.at”,
         “madmp:institution”:”AT-Vienna-University-of-Technology”
} ],

Caption: An example of data models for traditional DMPs (upper part) and machine-actionable DMPs (lower part). (Miksa et al. 2018: Fig. 1)

PIDs and DMPs
The story of PIDs in DMPs, or at least my involvement in the discussion, began with a lot of hand waving and musical puns at PIDapalooza 2016 (slides). After a positive reception and many deep follow-on conversations (unexpected yet gratifying to discover a new nerd community), things evolved into what is now a serious exploration of how to leverage PIDs for and in DMPs. The promise of PIDs to identify and connect research-relevant entities is tremendous and we’re fortunate to ride the coattails of some smart people who are making significant strides in this arena.

For our own PID-DMP R&D we’re partnering with one of the usual PID suspects, Datacite, to draw from their expertise and technical capabilities. Datacite contributed to the timely publication of the European Commission-funded FREYA report, which provides the necessary background research and a straightforward starting point(s). There’s also an established RDA PID interest group that we plan to engage with more as things progress.

A primary goal of FREYA is the creation and expansion of the “PID Graph.” The PID Graph “connects and integrates PID systems, creating relationships across a network of PIDs and serving as a basis for new services.” The report summarizes the current state of PID services as well as some emerging initiatives that we hope to harness (each is classified as mature, emerging, or immature):

  • ORCID iDs for researchers (mature)
  • DOIs for publications and data (mature), and software (emerging; also see SWH IDs)
  • Research OrgIDs for organizations (aka ROR; emerging and CDL is participating so we have an intimate view)
  • Global grant IDs (emerging and very exciting to track the prototyping efforts of Wellcome, NIH, and MRC!)
  • Data repository IDs (immature but on the radar as we address DMPs)
  • Project IDs/RAiDs (emerging and we see a lot of overlap with DMPs)

It also describes a vast array of PIDs for other things, all of which are potentially useful for maDMPs as we reconfigure them as an inventory of linked research outputs (Table 1: RRIDs, protocols, research facilities, field stations, physical samples, cultural artifacts, conferences, etc. etc.). Taken together, these efforts are aimed at extending the universe of things that can be identified with PIDs and expanding what can be done with them. This, in turn, supports automation and machine-actionability to achieve better research data management and promote open science.

Summing up
For now we’ll continue exploring our graph database and interviewing stakeholders who contributed seed data to dive deeper into their workflows, challenges, and use cases for maDMPs. This runs parallel to the activities of the RDA DMP Common Standards WG and various emerging PID initiatives. Based on this overlapping community research, we can move forward with outlining what to implement and test. The recommendations of the RDA group for DMP common standards are a given, and below is a high-level plan for PID prototyping:

PIDs for DMPs and PIDs in DMPs:

  • DOIs for DMPs: define metadata
  • PIDs in DMPs: What can we achieve by leveraging mature PID services? How do we make the information flow between stakeholders and systems?

Stay tuned as the story develops here on the blog! I’ll also be presenting on maDMPs in a data repositories session convened by our BCO-DMO partners at the upcoming American Geophysical Union meeting in DC (program here, 11 Dec). And Daniel Mietchen will be at PIDapalooza 2019 (Dublin, 23-24 Jan) promoting a highly relevant initiative: PIDs for FAIR ethics review processes.

Prettier and mobile-ready(-er)

The latest DMPTool release is focused on making the tool more attractive and mobile-ready, AND more accessible (release notes). Continue reading for highlights and screenshots, or you can visit the live version of the tool for an improved user experience. Please report any issues via the helpdesk or GitHub issues.

After a thorough round of quality assurance testing, we’ll upgrade the DMPTool to the latest version of the Roadmap code in the coming weeks (v2.0.0 and blog news)…stay tuned. Some accessibility work will continue on the core codebase in the coming months.

Improved responsiveness

We made it easier to access the public pages and improved menu navigation on mobile and tablet devices (screenshots below).

mobile pages

Redesigned institutional branding banner

Organizational admins have the option to upload a logo that displays in the main branding banner for their local users (see example for UCSD users below; instructions for admins on Customizing your institutional profile). In connection with the changes to improve the responsiveness of the tool, we also redesigned the banner to accommodate the wide variety of logo shapes and sizes, in particular, large horizontal logos.

unaffiliated branding

Standard DMPTool branding for unaffiliated users.

UCSD branding

UCSD branding for users affiliated with that institution.

Roadmap back to school edition

Summer activities and latest (major 2.0.0) release
The DMPRoadmap team is checking in with an overdue update after rotating holidays and work travels over the past few months. We also experienced some core team staff transitions and began juggling some parallel projects. As a result we haven’t been following a regular development schedule, but we have been busy tidying up the codebase and documentation.

This post summarizes the contents of the major release and provides instructions for those with existing installations who will need to make some configuration changes in order to upgrade to the latest and greatest DMPRoadmap code. In addition to infrastructure improvements, we fixed some bugs and completed some feature enhancements. We appreciate the feedback and encourage you to keep it coming since this helps us set priorities (listed on the development roadmap) and meet the data management planning needs of our increasingly international user community. On that note, we welcome Japan (National Institute for Informatics) and South Africa (NeDICC) as additional voices in the DMP conversation!

Read on for more details about all the great things packed into the latest release, as well as some general updates about our services and of course machine-actionable DMPs. The DCC has already pushed the release out to its services and the DMPTool will be upgrading soon – separate communications to follow. Those who run their own instances should check out the full release notes and a video tutorial on the validations and data clean-up (thanks Gavin!) to complete the upgrade.

DMPRoadmap housekeeping work (full release notes, highlights below)

  • Instructions for existing installations to upgrade to the latest release. Please read and follow these carefully to prevent any issues arising from invalid data. We highly recommend that you backup your existing database before running through these steps to prepare your system for Roadmap 2.0.0!
  • Added a full suite of automated unit tests to make it easier to incorporate external contributions and improve overall reliability.
  • Added data validations for improved data integrity.
  • Created new and revised existing documentation for coding conventions, tests, translations, etc (Github wiki). We can now update existing translations and add new ones more efficiently.

DMPRoadmap new features and bug fixes

  • Comments are now visible by default without having to click ‘Show.’ Stay tuned for additional improvements to the plan comments functionality in upcoming sprints.
  • Renamed/standardized text labels for ‘Save’ buttons for clarity.
  • Added a button to download a list of org users as a csv file (Admin > ‘Users’ page)
  • Added a global usage report for total users and plans for all orgs (Admin > ‘Usage’ page)
  • Admins can create customized template sections and place them at the beginning or end of funder templates via drag-and-drop
  • Removed multi-select box as an answer format and replaced with multiple choice

DCC/DMPonline subscriptions [Please note: this does not apply to DMPTool users] Another recent change is in the DMPonline service delivery model. The DCC has been running DMP services for overseas clients for several years and is now transitioning the core DMPonline tool to a subscription model based on administrator access to the tool. The core functionality (developing, sharing and publishing DMPs) remains freely accessible to all, as well as the templates, guidance and user manuals we offer. We also remain committed to the Open Source DMPRoadmap codebase. The charges cover the support infrastructure necessary to run a production-level international service. More information is available for our users in a recent announcement. We’re also growing the support team to keep up with the requests we’re receiving. If you are interested in being at the cutting edge of DMP services and engaging with the international community to define future directions, please apply to join us!

Machine-actionable DMPs
Increasing the opportunities for machine-actionability of DMPs was one of the spurs behind the DMPRoadmap collaboration. Facilities already exist via use of a number of standard identifiers and we’re moving on both the standards development tracks and code development and testing.

The CDL has been prototyping for the NSF EAGER grant and started a blog series focused on this work (#1, #2, next installation forthcoming), with an eye to seeding conversations and sharing experiences as many of us begin to experiment in multiple directions. CDL prototyping efforts are separate from the DMPRoadmap project currently but will inform future enhancements.

We’re also attempting to inventory global activities and projects on https://activedmps.org/ Some updates for this page are in the works to highlight new requirements and tools. Please add any other updates you’re aware of! Sarah ran a workshop in South Africa in August on behalf of NeDICC to gather requirements for machine-actionable DMPs there and the DCC will be hosting a visit from DIRISA in December. All the content from the workshop is on Zenodo and you can see how engaged the audience got in mapping our solutions. The DCC is also presenting on recent trends in DMPs as part of the OpenAIRE and FOSTER webinar series for Open Access week 2018. The talk maps out the current and emerging tools from a European perspective. Check out the slides and video.

You can also check out the preprint and/or stop by the poster for ‘Ten Principles for Machine-Actionable DMPs’ at Force2018 in Montreal and the RDA plenary in Botswana. This work presents 10 community-generated principles to put machine-actionable DMPs into practice and realize their benefits. The principles describe specific actions that various stakeholders are already undertaking or should take.

We encourage everyone to contribute to the session for the DMP Common Standards working group at the next RDA plenary (Nov 5-8 in Botswana). There is community consensus that interoperability and delivery of DMP information across systems requires a common data model; this group aims to deliver a framework for this essential first step in actualizing machine-actionable DMPs.